Security Procedures

The importance of establishing sound security procedures is imperative in the current global environment. The procedures outlined below are industry specific guidelines designed to address areas relative to the shipment of HHG that require an increase in security. These recommendations for household goods shipment security are modified guidelines taken in part from the U.S. Customs C-TPAT program, and these measures are provided here to serve as a blueprint for your own implemenation. Because HHG transportation is a complex issue, the information provided below will discuss the following common topics:

  • Operational Security
  • Physical Security
  • Access Controls
  • Documentation Controls
  • Personnel Security
    • Security Awareness Education and Training
    • Conveyance Security

Operational Security

Agents should establish procedures to guard against the packing and loading of unknown articles and materials. These security procedures should include:

  • The supervised loading/unloading of household goods.
  • The proper sealing, marking and counting of household goods and boxes loaded into the ocean container.
  • Proper documentation for goods loaded into the container should accompany paperwork that is traveling with the container.
  • Proper procedures for affixing, replacing, recording, tracking, and verifying seals on containers and trailers should be in place.
  • The addition of any supplementary goods to the container shipment should be closely monitored, as well as increased inspection of PBO boxes.
  • Random and unannounced security reviews of on-site packing and loading/unloading procedures should be conducted.
  • Procedures for notifying law enforcement agencies should be in place, in the event that anomalies or illegal activities are detected.

Physical Security

Agents should establish procedures to guard against the packing and loading of unknown articles and materials. These security procedures should include:

  • The supervised loading/unloading of household goods.
  • The proper sealing, marking, and counting of household goods and boxes loaded into the ocean container.
  • Proper documentation for goods loaded into the container should accompany paperwork that is traveling with the container.
  • Proper procedures for affixing, replacing, recording, tracking, and verifying seals on containers and trailers should be in place.
  • The addition of any supplementary goods to the container shipment should be closely monitored, as well as increased inspection of PBO boxes.
  • Random and unannounced security reviews of on-site packing and loading/unloading procedures should be conducted.
  • Procedures for notifying law enforcement agencies should be in place, in the event that anomalies or illegal activities are detected.

Access Controls

ACCESS CONTROLS: Unauthorized access to facilities and company equipment should be prohibited. Controls should include:

  • The positive identification, recording, and tracking of all employees, visitors, and vendors on company premises.
  • Procedures should be in place for challenging the presence of unauthorized/unidentified persons.
  • An authorized company representative should be present whenever shipments are brought into or removed from the company’s facilities.
  • Company vehicle access is limited to authorized personnel and monitored internally.
  • Procedures should be in place to notify the appropriate authorities in the event a company vehicle is missing.

Documentation Controls

Companies should ensure that all information provided by the shipper and used in the clearing of the shipment, is accurate, legible and protected against the exchange, loss or introduction of erroneous information. Documentation controls should include:

  • Procedures for maintaining the accuracy of information received, including the shipper and consignee name and address, first and second notify parties, description, quantity, and unit of measure (i.e. boxes, cartons, etc.) of the shipment being cleared.
  • Procedures for recording, reporting, and/or investigating anomalies should be in place.
  • Procedures for tracking the movement of incoming and outgoing shipments.
  • Procedures to safeguard computer access and information.

Personnel Security

Companies should conduct employment screening and interviewing of prospective employees to include periodic background checks and application verifications.

Security Awareness, Education and Training

A security awareness and training program should be provided to employees to include the recognition of internal conspiracies, maintaining shipment integrity, and determining and addressing unauthorized access. These programs should offer incentives for active employee participation in security controls. Furthermore, the training should include aspects of recognizing and addressing potentially dangerous situations that may occur during the packing and loading process. Employees should be encouraged to notify management if they perceive any anomalies or uncommon activity during the packing and loading of a customer’s belongings.

Conveyance Security

Conveyance integrity should be maintained to protect against the introduction of unauthorized personnel and/or material. Security should include:

  • The physical search of all readily accessible areas.
  • The securing of internal/external compartments and panels.
  • Procedures for reporting cases in which unauthorized personnel, materials, or signs of tampering, are discovered should also be established.
  • Procedures for contacting the appropriate authorities should be in place.